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Understanding Content: Lead Generation vs. Demand Generation – Nick Rojas
By: Nick Rojas   (03/27/2015)

Though content marketing is now an accepted and widely adopted form of marketing, there continue to be a lot of nuances that people don’t seem to understand. One of these tricky nuances is the distinction between lead generation and demand generation. How are these things similar? How are they different? If you want to be successful in content marketing, appreciating the differences between them is key. Different types of content work better for different types of content marketing. A blog post can be a good device for either lead generation or demand generation, but which one depends on how (and why) you write it. Understanding and appreciating these differences is integral to having a successful content marketing campaign.

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Lessons Learned from the Hits and Misses of the 2014-15 TV Season – Ed Martin
By: Ed Martin   (03/26/2015)

Anyway, as Deadline and others have declared, the outsize success of shows with diverse casts this season – especially ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder” and Fox’s “Empire” – suggests that the networks will do what they always have done: look for clones of the big new shows of the moment. So don’t be surprised if a few really terrible shows with diverse casts are announced during Upfront week. Copycat programming – once famously referred to as cookie-cutter television – almost always produces pale imitations of the hits that forcibly inspired them. Remember the long-term plague of “Friends” clones? Now that was a walking-dead apocalypse. “HTGAWM” and especially “Empire” certainly appeal to audiences of color, and that has certainly contributed to their strong ratings and overall success. But neither show was instantly propelled into the popular-culture pantheon simply because it featured a cast that was not predominantly white. They succeeded as brilliantly as they did for three reasons.

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Time to RE:THINK the Role of Research -- Charlene Weisler
By: Charlene Weisler   (03/26/2015)

This year’s ARF Re:Think conference showed the industry how far research has come in impacting the overall media business model. In the days of spots and dots and proxy demographic targets, research played more of a report card role asking the eternal question: How well did we do within our limited universe of influence? But now, thanks to digital video across devices, big data, technological advances such as machine learning and qual/quant hybrid measurements such as neuroscience, we find that the business advancements of programmatic, cross platform and advanced TV require a strong, visionary research department role.

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Making Insights Come True on YouTube -- Cenk Bulbul, Google
By: Cenk Bulbul   (03/26/2015)

We have been using a new tool called “Google’s Brand Lift solution” to answer exactly that question. This tool allows advertisers to gather brand metrics about YouTube ads in a matter of days in a controlled experiment setting. Thousands of advertisers across a variety of verticals have already used this tool on YouTube to test and optimize their video ads since we launched it in 2014. We ran some meta-analysis to look at the findings from the tool to help advertisers with practical tips. After analyzing around 50 campaigns from well-known Fortune 100 brands and category leaders, running on Google Preferred (some of YouTube’s most popular channels), we found that 94% of the campaigns drove a significant lift in ad recall, with an average recall lift of 80%. We also found that 65% of Google Preferred ads saw an increase in brand awareness, with an average lift of 17%.

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Title II Obama? Apple vs. Comcast? DISH vs. Bundle? -– Paul S. Maxwell
By: Paul S. Maxwell   (03/25/2015)

Yep, I really love the Federal Confusion Commission. A “light” Title II followed by a rule telling states they can’t regulate municipal broadband followed by a little love tap saying let’s look at “effective competition” and invent a better regime to decide by shifting the responsibility to -- you guessed it -- municipalities. Of course, STELAR told them to do something like that. Reality check: DBS has been a more than viable MVPD competitor for years (and years). Very impressive, too, is the Republican complaint about President Obama’s “secret” pressure on FCC Chair Tom Wheeler and the FCC to pass “light” Title II regulations … so secret the President did a video on his preference. Biggest news, though: Wheeler actually talked to White House aides more than any other chairman in history.

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A Moment of Unforgettable Emotional Power on ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” – Ed Martin
By: Ed Martin   (03/24/2015)

Anyone who thinks ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” has worn out its welcome – that there isn’t a compelling reason to continue watching this veteran competition program – must be prompted to reevaluate his or her assertion after this week’s show. After all, when was the last time a network television series packed the kind of emotional power we saw Monday on “Dancing” when Iraq War veteran and double amputee Noah Galloway – one of this season’s more popular competitors – was surprisingly reunited with his girlfriend Jamie Boyd, whom he hadn’t seen in six months. Extra emo bonus: The reason Galloway hadn’t seen her in so long is because she has been in Army Reserve training, preparing to serve her country!

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Will the Real Apple TV Really Stand Up? -- Simon Applebaum
By: Simon Applebaum   (03/23/2015)

Here's the definition I use for a smart TV device: A set-top, stick or plug-in which gives you the ability to watch (and listen to) much more than your favorite programs/channels, including Internet content (not just Web videos), audio services, video games played without a console like Playstation or Xbox, and a variety of original interactive applications. Now consider these milestones. Ten million people deploy Roku in some fashion -- stick, set-top and lately, TV set. Google Chromecast, in the marketplace since mid-2013, has chalked up more than one billion views. Amazon Fire TV will celebrate one year of existence next week, and while company executives keep the size of their consumer universe to themselves, they remark that sales and usage of their product in set-top or stick form has exceeded expectations. Intel's ComputeStick, allowing Windows 8 and its apps on the TV set, will premiere any day, and Shield, the device from computer chip king Nvidia, is scheduled to debut in May.

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Wearables, Connected Devices and IoTs: Where Do Marketers Fit In? -- Sam Zises, Founder and CEO, [L]earned Media
By: Sam Zises   (03/23/2015)

The impact of mobile, connected and wearable devices combined with digital and social media has transformed how people engage with brands and make purchase decisions today. As a result, companies have to adapt how they approach many aspects of their businesses. Brands can now take advantage of new consumer engagement opportunities that are beginning to exist across social media, content marketing and general customer-relationship management tactics.

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Fox's “Empire” Made Watching “Live” TV Hot Again – Ed Martin
By: Ed Martin   (03/20/2015)

Outside of reality competition shows, can you recall the last time a broadcast series commanded the kind of attention that “Empire” enjoyed during its two-hour season finale on Wednesday night? Since so much of the fun of this show is not knowing what is going to happen next – in part because characters change their minds and their loyalties more often than ordinary people change their underwear, but also because most episodes of this sizzling series power through more story developments than play out in most other series during an entire season – standard DVR behavior just won’t do.

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Hindsight Reflections on Six Decades in Media and Advertising: Part 2 – Steve Fajen
By: Steve Fajen   (03/20/2015)

Following a decade of growth after Ted Turner’s introduction of a 24-hour news network, the old television dial went from thirteen to a digital three hundred plus channels. In the face of this fragmentation enter Professor John Phillip Jones and super-star media thinker/communicator Erwin Ephron with Recency Theory. Simply stated, Recency Theory maintained that people were much more receptive to advertising when in the market for a product. Since the population is so large and, excepting seasonal products, we don’t really know when given numbers of customers are ready-to-buy, it is better to advertise continuously than to flight with big chunks of advertising and then to disappear, harboring funds for the next blitz, as research from the 60s led us to believe. The concept simplified media planning and changed the way major advertisers spent their money. In a sense, building brand equity now rode on the coattails of producing immediate sales on a rolling basis.

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MediaBizBloggers.com

Though content marketing is now an accepted and widely adopted form of marketing, there continue to be a lot of nuances that people don’t seem to understand. One of these tricky nuances is the distinction between lead generation and demand generation. How are these things similar? How are they different? If you want to be successful in content marketing, appreciating the differences between them is key. Different types of content work better for different types of content marketing. A blog post can be a good device for either lead generation or demand generation, but which one depends on how (and why) you write it. Understanding and appreciating these differences is integral to having a successful content marketing campaign.

Read More

We have been using a new tool called “Google’s Brand Lift solution” to answer exactly that question. This tool allows advertisers to gather brand metrics about YouTube ads in a matter of days in a controlled experiment setting. Thousands of advertisers across a variety of verticals have already used this tool on YouTube to test and optimize their video ads since we launched it in 2014. We ran some meta-analysis to look at the findings from the tool to help advertisers with practical tips. After analyzing around 50 campaigns from well-known Fortune 100 brands and category leaders, running on Google Preferred (some of YouTube’s most popular channels), we found that 94% of the campaigns drove a significant lift in ad recall, with an average recall lift of 80%. We also found that 65% of Google Preferred ads saw an increase in brand awareness, with an average lift of 17%.

Read More
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